My photinia looks dead. Started with leaves. Live in zone 9 and truck is wet…

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    lindaclindac
    Greenhorn
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    lionnalionna
    Greenhorn
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    Oh my, oh my. This one is a goner.

    Normal canker would be more localized, not infecting the entire tree.

    I’m wondering if it isn’t fire blight because the sappy flow from the trunk seems clear, not whitish, but I do see white flecks. What do you see if you lift some of the wet bark, is it whitish underneath like mold? The other symptoms like general dying off match fire blight, though.

    I’m hoping no tell-tale yellow mushrooms appear nearby. That would be a sure sign of honey fungus, not a good thing at all to have in the garden. I hope it isn’t that!

    Hopefully it’s just a particularly vigorous stain of blight, perhaps phytophthora?

    I’m sorry to say I don’t think much can save it. Since I’m already answering a bit late, it must have even lost all its leaves by now, do you confirm?

    The next question, dear, is more important: what can you replace it with? Since this fungus is often made more aggressive by wet or heavy soil, perhaps you’d better plant something that resists that well, like Camellia sasanqua or Nandina.

    Don’t plant things like cherry laurel, it says in the article I linked above that Rosacea plants are easily sick from fire blight. But one line later it cites an exception: plum! Feel like growing plum?

     

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