Is my water killing my plants?

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    dillingerdillinger
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    Hello, we are new to flowers and landscaping. My wife has always had some potted plants around the house but never had tremendous luck with them growing. It seems that where ever she waters them (where the water actually touches the plant) The plant starts to wither and die where the water touches it. Our water has extremely high pH and alkalinity. Like off the charts alkalinity. I have a swimming pool that is a constant battle with the water chemistry. Is it possible that the water itself is hurting the plants? We just installed about a $12,000 landscaping with drip irrigation and I just want to make sure that my water is not going to hinder the plants. And if it is are there any remedies to help reduce the water pH as we are watering the plants.

    Thank you for any advice.

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    leronzaflowersleronzaflowers
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    Welcome to the world of gardening! It’s quite possible that your water’s high pH and alkalinity are affecting the plants. Plants can be sensitive to water quality. Consider testing the water specifically used for irrigation. You might need to install a pH adjustment system or use rainwater for watering to create a more suitable environment for your plants. Proper pH levels will certainly help your newly landscaped garden thrive. Good luck, and happy gardening!

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    buymyfarmAnonymous
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    Hello! It’s definitely possible that the high pH and alkalinity of your water could be affecting your plants. Excessive alkalinity can inhibit the absorption of nutrients by plants, leading to issues like withering and dying. It’s great that you’ve invested in drip irrigation, as it can help control the amount of water and its distribution. To address the water pH, you might consider installing a water treatment system specifically designed to lower pH levels. Additionally, using rainwater or distilled water for watering can help mitigate the effects of high alkalinity. It’s always a good idea to consult with a local garden center or agricultural extension office for tailored advice based on your specific water conditions and plant needs. Good luck with your landscaping endeavors!

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    gulabAnonymous
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    If your plants are exhibiting signs of distress, it’s worth considering whether your water might be a contributing factor. Signs such as browning leaf edges, stunted growth, or yellowing leaves could indicate issues with your water quality. To address this concern and learn more about optimizing your plant care routine, visit http://www.gulab.pk.

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    PlantoraAnonymous
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    Water can possibly damage plants for a number of reasons. Here are a few typical concerns to think about.

    Plants can be harmed by low water quality, which includes excessive fluoride, chlorine, salt, and heavy metal concentrations. Frequently present in tap water, fluoride and chlorine can eventually build up in soil and cause poisoning.

    Water’s pH level can have an impact on plant health. Most plants like slightly acidic to neutral pH. Water that is overly acidic or alkaline can reduce nutrient availability in the soil and affect plant development.

    Over-watering or under-watering both harm the plants. Over-watering can lead to root rot and other diseases, while under-watering can cause blackening and browning of leaves and nutrient deficiencies.

    To determine if your water is harming your plants, consider testing its quality, pH level, and temperature.

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    mahnoor1Anonymous
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    It’s possible that your water might be harming your plants. Factors like pH levels, mineral content, and chemicals can affect plant health. Consider testing your water and adjusting as needed, or try using filtered or rainwater for watering. –NA WA

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    pooja1735Anonymous
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    If your plants are suffering, it’s possible that your water might be a contributing factor. There are a few things to consider:

    Check water quality for minerals.
    Ensure proper pH level.
    Avoid overwatering and ensure drainage.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)